5G the Free WiFi Killer

From: Dave Burstein dslprime.com
Date: Monday, August 24, 2015
Subject: “5G the Free WiFi Killer” EE Times

The Intel/Verizon/Ericsson model of future wireless has everything controlled by a (carrier-managed) gateway. This report from the Intel Developers’ Forum suggests troubling consequences.
The EE Times article below may be making some assumptions I don’t share, but the underlying point is on target. The author fears a carrier gateway will impede WiFi and more. To be proven.
50-70% of wireless traffic now goes over WiFi, a figure that will increase as faster WiFi routers become common and more home gateways are configured to share unused bandwidth.
That’s an existential threat to phone companies depending on revenue from expanding data usage. They are fighting back in industry fora, including defining LTE-U/LAA as “LTE spectrum owners only” and seeking to dedicate 40 MHz of current WiFi spectrum to the 4 telcos.
Anyone who believes in a “multi-stakeholder” “open” Internet should be worried. In particular, the carriers are bringing this to industry only organizations especially 3GPP (the LTE standard setter), EU 5G groups, the Flex5GWare project and Horizon2020.
We badly need to get a consumer voice in these groups. I’ve raised the issue to Larry Strickling (U.S. Gov) and Kathy Brown (ISOC). vocal supporters of “multi-stakeholder.” The decisions being made in these groups will have more impact on consumers than the limited scope of the ITU/ICANN debate. I’m only one voice and I hope more speak up on the importance of the public interest.

5G the Free WiFi Killer

http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1327482&

Integrating comm comes at a price
8/21/2015 09:50 AM EDT

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif.—5G may be not much more than a moniker for what comes after 4G, but Intel clarified its vision recently at a keynote during the Intel Developer Forum 2015 (IDF, San Francisco, Aug.18-20). “Seamless” is the goal and it comes at a price.

The top-line is that Intel hopes to apply all its expertise in computing, networking and wireless communications to make a seamless 5G solution that incorporates distributed intelligence at all levels–from the smartphone to the router to the basestation aggregator to cloudlets, clouds and our fastest supercomputers.

The bottom line is that cellular, WiFi, centimeter- and millimeter wavelength bands must be seamlessly integrated from the user’s point-of-view, according to Aicha Evans, vice president of platform engineering group and general manager of the communications and devices group at Intel.

“5G is not about faster, but about integrating all types of connectivity,” Evans told her keynote attendees at IDF. “The building blocks of 5G are already here today.”

To the carriers this integration will come at a price, since 5G-for-all presents the opportunity to kill free WiFi and instead charge users for every data packet they send or receive, no matter which of the integrated communications technologies is used. At Evans’ keynote she gathered together carriers, service providers and strategists to outline what it is that they expect from 5G, including Alex Choi, chief technical officer (CTO) of SK Telecom (Asia), Bin Shen, Verizon’s vice president of strategy (U.S.) and Paul McNamara, vice president of Ericsson’s corporate strategy group (Europe).

However, before the panel painted the world-changing picture of extraordinary speeds and ultra-low latency–at a price–Intel’s Sandra Rivera, vice president of the data center group and general manager of the Internet of Things (IoT) described the benefits of 5G to the users.

“Intelligence will begin with at the base station,” Rivera asserted to the crowd at IDF. <snip>

Editor, Fast Net News, Net Policy News and DSL Prime
Author with Jennie Bourne  DSL (Wiley) and Web Video: Making It Great, Getting It Noticed (Peachpit)
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