Common Core architect David Coleman

The College Board has knowingly lied about using best practices in developing the “revamped” SAT, and in the process of selling the SAT as a state-wide and/or graduation exam, will be lying some more. And it would appear that even this stripped down, cut corners approach isn’t letting the College Board get tests written fast enough, for as Schneider found poking around Reddit, the same form of the SAT was given in March and in June.

The SAT– Worse Than You Think Folks have been questioning the accuracy, validity and usefulness of the SAT for decades, and the chorus of criticism only increased when College Board, the test manufacturing company responsible for the SAT, brought in Common Core architect David Coleman to take over. Coleman’s fast and ugly rewrite of the venerable test was intended to bring it in line with the K-12 standards of Common Core. Coleman, whose ego has always seemed to be Grand Canyon sized, had finished redefining education for K-12 students– now he was going to fix college, too. And, the College Board hoped, he was also going to recapture a share of the market dominated by the ACT. In fact, a plan to grab huge market share by getting states to use the SAT as their federally-mandated Big Standardized Test– or even an exit exam.

Manuel Alfaro

Over the last year, I’ve explored many different options that would allow me to provide students and their families the critical information they need to make informed decisions about the SAT. At the same time, I was always seeking the option that would have minimal impact on your lives.  I gave David Coleman several opportunities to be a decent human being. Using HR and others, he built a protective barrier around himself that I was unable to penetrate. Being unable to reach him, I was left with my current option as the best choice.

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http://curmudgucation.blogspot.com/2016/06/the-sat-worse-than-you-think.html

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