A Critical Moment for the Future of the Internet | Techonomy

A Critical Moment for the Future of the Internet By Fadi Chehadé

The Internet, the greatest invention of our generation — several generations in fact — is in many ways a reflection of the American Dream. It’s vast and open, unlimited in its potential reach. It’s inclusive and welcoming. Anyone can be part of it and make a difference. The fastest growing part of the global economy is Internet-based, and the Internet accounts for a significant and growing portion of global GDP. According to Boston Consulting Group, the Internet is contributing up to 8 percent of GDP in some economies, powering growth and creating jobs.

You’d be correct in arguing it’s an American-made innovation. We can trace the roots of the Internet back some 50 years to a U.S. Defense Department research program. But as the Internet has expanded globally, it’s become increasingly clear that one government cannot lay claim to it. The Internet is a worldwide resource. It belongs to everyone.

Appropriately, the U.S. Government has long understood the Internet’s global potential. That’s why it helped create the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) in 1998 — a neutral, independent and private-sector led organization designed to coordinate the Internet’s domain name system functions. Its operations are not made under the direction of one government, but through a bottom-up, multi-stakeholder policy development process involving business, civil society, engineers, academics, everyday users and many governments (around 150 of them participate). Under that system, the Internet has flourished, connecting over 3 billion of us, through our billions of devices.

Over the past two decades, the U.S. Government has gradually lightened its touch in its stewardship over the key Internet domain name system functions operated by ICANN. These technical functions are known as the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) functions. The U.S. Government is now prepared to give up stewardship over the IANA functions altogether.

But why? And why now?

The U.S. Government always envisioned that its role in the IANA functions would be temporary. In March of 2014, the U.S. Commerce Department’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) announced its intent to transition out of its stewardship of the IANA functions. In its announcement, NTIA cited its belief that ICANN as an organization has matured and improved its accountability, transparency and its technical competence. NTIA also asserted that the Internet, managed and driven by the global community of diverse stakeholders, is in very good hands.

The current model of Internet governance is the only one that can keep pace with the global expansion of users, including where, how, how often and in what language they’re using it. Continual evolution is key: Internet governance must evolve to meet the changing needs of all users to ensure the network remains available, open, stable and secure. A report by Microsoft projects that the number of Internet users will grow to 4.7 billion in 2025, 75 percent of that growth coming from emerging economies. We must work together to take into consideration this changing landscape.

Many believe that if the U.S. Government does not step aside, other governments, including some that are uncomfortable with an open and inclusive Internet, will step in to try to capture control of it through intergovernmental organizations. Alternatively, governments could become motivated to break away from the one, unified Internet to form their own national or regional networks, essentially fragmenting the Internet we know today. The result of this could be a patchwork of incompatible networks spread across different nation states, with long-term social, cultural, political and economic casualties. Why take that chance?

The ICANN multi-stakeholder community brings together thousands of representatives from large and small businesses and civil society with technical experts, researchers, academics and end users from all over the world. Our role at ICANN is to coordinate this community. We are neutral and independent facilitators.

Many stakeholders have been working tirelessly over the past year to meet NTIA’s guidelines for the transition of their stewardship role to the global multi-stakeholder community. Since March 2014, the community has spent more than 400 hours together on calls and in meetings, working to develop a proposal that meets the following guidelines:

• Supports and enhances the existing multi-stakeholder model.

• Maintains the security, stability and resiliency of the Internet Domain Name System.

• Meets the needs and expectations of the global customers and partners of the IANA services.

• Maintains the openness of the Internet.

They also have to take into account that NTIA also specified that it would not accept a proposal that replaces NTIA’s role with a government-led or intergovernmental organization solution.

Should the transition fail, the United States could lose credibility in its quest to maintain an open, multi-stakeholder-driven Internet. The risk of fragmentation will grow and U.S. and global economies risk losing the commercial and social benefits inherent in the single, global, free and open Internet where innovation happens, and on which we’ve all come to rely.

I invite you to please join our process. If you have concerns, voice them. If you agree with the fundamental principles the proposal is based on, share that. Engage with the multi-stakeholder community and share your thoughts and opinions. It is critical to the success of our effort and the future of the Internet that we have as much participation in the process as possible.

Fadi Chehadé is the president and CEO of ICANN, a not-for-profit, public benefit corporation with participants from all over the world dedicated to keeping the Internet secure, stable and interoperable. He will be speaking on a session at the Techonomy Policy conference June 9 on the Worrisome Future of the Internet.

To attend, you can register here. Original article published at Techonomy.com.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/techonomy/a-critical-moment-for-the_b_7513308.html

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The USA FREEDOM Act, the President’s Review Group and the Biggest Intelligence Reform in 40 Years

The USA FREEDOM Act, the President’s Review Group and the Biggest Intelligence Reform in 40 Years

https://privacyassociation.org/news/a/the-usa-freedom-act-the-presidents-review-group-and-the-biggest-intelligence-reform-in-40-years/

 

Two years after the first story based on Edward Snowden’s leaks hit the press, the U.S. government enacted the USA FREEDOM Act, ending bulk collection under Section 215. As one of five members of President Obama’s Review Group on Intelligence and Communications Technology, I applaud its passage—the biggest pro-privacy change to U.S. intelligence law since the original enactment of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act in 1978.

There is a close fit between the Review Group’s work and the new law as well as multiple significant reform measures the Obama administration has already adopted without legislative change. In this era of partisan gridlock, the U.S. system of government has proved more responsive and resilient than many skeptics had predicted.

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US Dept of Commerce seeks comments on proposed export changes

The Wassenaar Arrangement (full name: The Wassenaar Arrangement on Export Controls for Conventional Arms and Dual-Use Goods and Technologies) is a multilateral export control regime (MECR) with 41 participating states including many former COMECON (Warsaw Pact) countries.

An FRN issued on 5/20/2015

https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2015/05/20/2015-11642/wassenaar-arrangement-2013-plenary-agreements-implementation-intrusion-and-surveillance-items

describes a proposal by Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) for a license requirement for the export, reexport, or transfer (in-country) of systems, equipment or components specially designed for the generation, operation or delivery of, or communication with, intrusion software; software specially designed or modified for the development or production of such systems, equipment or components; software specially designed for the generation, operation or delivery of, or communication with, intrusion software; technology required for the development of intrusion software; Internet Protocol (IP) network communications surveillance systems or equipment and test, inspection, production equipment, specially designed components therefor, and development and production software and technology therefor.

The FRN notes that BIS is seeking information about the effect of this rule and would appreciate the submission of comments, and especially answers to the following questions:

1. How many additional license applications would your company be required to submit per year under the requirements of this proposed rule? If any, of those applications:
a. How many additional applications would be for products that are currently eligible for license exceptions?
b. How many additional applications would be for products that currently are classified EAR99?

2. How many deemed export, reexport or transfer (in-country) license applications would your company be required to submit per year under the requirements of this rule?

3. Would the rule have negative effects on your legitimate vulnerability research, audits, testing or screening and your company’s ability to protect your own or your client’s networks? If so, explain how.

4. How long would it take you to answer the questions in proposed paragraph (z) to Supplement No. 2 to part 748? Is this information you already have for your products?

* The ADDRESSES section of this proposed rule includes information about how to submit comments.

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[ECP] Educational CyberPlayGround, Inc. K12 Newsletters

K12 Education STEM Projects

SCIENCE – Home Economics – Math – Environment


Cleaning Appliances

VIDEO

Refrigerator and Freezer
The best cleaner is a mix of vinegar and water.
And for clean air, use fresh coffee grounds in a container with some holes in it in your refrigerator.
Coffee is better than baking soda for absorbing odors.

Washing Machine
Tang is the best way to clean your washing machine.
Front loading washing machine, use 1/4 cup of tang drink mix to an empty machine.
Run it through a basic cycle using hot water. This cleans the mineral deposits left from soap and also cleans the pipes.
When you use Tang in your front loading washing machine, once a week for four weeks and then once a month, and it’s just once a month on your dishwasher too!

Dishwasher
– add two cups of bleach to the bottom of an empty machine and run through a wash cycle.
– Then add four cups of white vinegar to the bottom and run through another cycle.


Homemade Cleaners
http://thefrugalgirls.com/homemade-cleaners

Laundry Detergent Recipe
Directions
http://thefrugalgirls.com/2010/08/how-to-make-homemade-laundry-detergent.html

  1. 1/2 Cup: Arm & Hammer Super Washing Soda {not Baking Soda}
  2. 1/2 Cup: Borax 1/3 Bar of Fels-Naptha Soap {you could also use Ivory soap, but if using Ivory… use the whole bar}
  3. Bucket {2 gallon size or larger} Empty laundry detergent containers or bucket with lid to store detergent.

Homemade Fabric Softener Recipe
Directions
http://thefrugalgirls.com/2010/10/homemade-fabric-softener.html

6 cups HOT water
3 cups White Vinegar
2 cups Suave Hair Conditioner {Refreshing Waterfall or Coconut scents}
Mix conditioner & hot water well, until conditioner is dissolved completely.
Add the vinegar, and mix well.
Store in a large container {empty fabric softener container, empty large vinegar bottle, etc}
Pour into a downy ball… or use approx. 2 tbsp. in the fabric softener spot in your laundry machine… then wash!

comments:

I also use the homemade laundry detergent in the dry form and use just plain white vinegar as a softener. I was amazed at how well the vinegar worked to soften my clothes … with no vinegar smell.

I dilute regular fabric softener 2x so end up with 3x the amount and use that as a liquid or leave it all in a bucket and throw sponges in. wring out the sponge and throw 1 or 2 in the dryer as dryer sheets

I have an HE washer and dryer. I have been using this homemade fabric softener for about 6 months now and I could not be happier. It works great. Sometimes my laundry used to smell after washing and drying it but not anymore. I also starting leaving my washer machine door open a little. Again, this homemade fabric softener is great and I have definitely saved money. I use Suave or V05 and try to keep the scent something like a breeze or fruity scent.

I have a frontloader as well. I have been using frontload machines for 14 yrs now. The vinegar is great as an additive for the frontload machines as it cleans the machine as well. Run the mixture through the dispenser :). i also use 3 cups white vinegar & hot water through my machine regularly as a cleaner. use the tray dispenser to dispere 1 cup & dump the other 2 cups on the inside add a white towel & hot water cycle it all the way through . It keep it fresh & clean isnde no midlew or build up

Homemade Dryer Sheets

Directions
http://thefrugalgirls.com/2010/01/save-money-on-laundry-cut-dryer-sheets-in-half.html

comments:

I also make my own dryers sheets.
I take a third of a bottle of your favorite fabric softner and pour it into an empty gallon jug. (cleaned milk jug works great!) Fill the rest of the way with tap water and shake. Pour some into a small open plastic container. Take two new (plain cheap) sponges and cut them in half. Place cut sponges in softner mix and then pull one out, ringing it slightly and add to your dryer. These work great and you can just keep using the sponges again and again.

I made a mixture of 2 cups of cheep suave hair conditioner and 4 cups of water. Pour the conditioner in a pot on low heat add water and pour it into any container you can seal I used an old icecream bucket, I bought a pack of 6 sponges and cut them in half throw them in the bucket and when you need a dryer sheet wring out excess liquid from one sponge so it isn’t dripping wet when it goes in the dryer and you can re use these over and over and the liquid mixture will last a long time I have laundry for 7 people and it works great to save money.

I use an old washcloth: pour just a small amount of liquid fabric softener on it and toss it in the dryer. It works fantastic! It’s way more economical than adding the liquid to the washing machine.

Homemade Fabreze Recipe
http://thefrugalgirls.com/2013/03/diy-homemade-febreeze-recipe.html

Directions:
Add 3 tbsp. Fabric Softener {like your favorite scent of Downy} to empty spray bottle
Fill spray bottle with approx. 2 – 3 cups hot water. {depending on size of bottle}
Add in 1 tbsp. Baking Soda Mix, and enjoy!!
Portions can be adjusted slightly, depending on the size of your spray bottle.

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[ECP] Educational CyberPlayGround K12 Newsletters May 1

May is celebrated as the Music Month:

MUSIC EDUCATION, CLASSROOM RESOURCES AND MUSIC LAW

IDEAS FOR CLASSROOM USE

THE HISTORY OF JAZZ

Question: Can You Guess who this is?

A Grandson of slaves, a boy was born in a poor neighborhood of New Orleans known as the “Back of Town.” His father abandoned the family when the child was an infant, His mother became a prostitute and the boy and his sister had to live with their grandmother. Early in life he proved to be gifted for music and with three other kids he sang in the streets of New Orleans. His first gains were the coins that were thrown to them. A Jewish family, Karnofsky, who had immigrated from Lithuania to the USA had pity for the 7-year-old boy and brought him into their home. Initially given ‘work’ in the house, to feed this hungry child. There he remained and slept in this Jewish families home where, for the first time in his life he was treated with kindness and tenderness. When he went to bed, Mrs. Karnovsky sang him a Russian Lullaby that he would sing with her. Later, he learned to sing and play several Russian and Jewish songs. Over time, this boy became the adopted son of this family. The Karnofskys gave him money to buy his first musical instrument; as was the custom in the Jewish families.
They sincerely admired his musical talent. Later, when he became a professional musician and composer, he used these Jewish melodies in compositions, such as St. James Infirmary and Go Down Moses. The little black boy grew up and wrote a book about this Jewish family who had adopted him in 1907.
In memory of this family and until the end of his life, he wore a star of David and said that in this family he had learned “how to live real life and determination.”

Answer: You might recognize his name. This little boy was called Louis “Satchmo” Armstrong. Louis Armstrong proudly spoke fluent Yiddish!

New Orleans-based Musicologist John Baron discusses Louis Armstrong’s relationship with the Karnofskys, a New Orleans Jewish family he worked for, and who helped him buy his first musical instrument. Interview by Neil W. Levin.

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