[ECP] Educational CyberPlayGround, Inc. K12 Newsletters

K12 Education STEM Projects

SCIENCE – Home Economics – Math – Environment


Cleaning Appliances

VIDEO

Refrigerator and Freezer
The best cleaner is a mix of vinegar and water.
And for clean air, use fresh coffee grounds in a container with some holes in it in your refrigerator.
Coffee is better than baking soda for absorbing odors.

Washing Machine
Tang is the best way to clean your washing machine.
Front loading washing machine, use 1/4 cup of tang drink mix to an empty machine.
Run it through a basic cycle using hot water. This cleans the mineral deposits left from soap and also cleans the pipes.
When you use Tang in your front loading washing machine, once a week for four weeks and then once a month, and it’s just once a month on your dishwasher too!

Dishwasher
– add two cups of bleach to the bottom of an empty machine and run through a wash cycle.
– Then add four cups of white vinegar to the bottom and run through another cycle.


Homemade Cleaners
http://thefrugalgirls.com/homemade-cleaners

Laundry Detergent Recipe
Directions
http://thefrugalgirls.com/2010/08/how-to-make-homemade-laundry-detergent.html

  1. 1/2 Cup: Arm & Hammer Super Washing Soda {not Baking Soda}
  2. 1/2 Cup: Borax 1/3 Bar of Fels-Naptha Soap {you could also use Ivory soap, but if using Ivory… use the whole bar}
  3. Bucket {2 gallon size or larger} Empty laundry detergent containers or bucket with lid to store detergent.

Homemade Fabric Softener Recipe
Directions
http://thefrugalgirls.com/2010/10/homemade-fabric-softener.html

6 cups HOT water
3 cups White Vinegar
2 cups Suave Hair Conditioner {Refreshing Waterfall or Coconut scents}
Mix conditioner & hot water well, until conditioner is dissolved completely.
Add the vinegar, and mix well.
Store in a large container {empty fabric softener container, empty large vinegar bottle, etc}
Pour into a downy ball… or use approx. 2 tbsp. in the fabric softener spot in your laundry machine… then wash!

comments:

I also use the homemade laundry detergent in the dry form and use just plain white vinegar as a softener. I was amazed at how well the vinegar worked to soften my clothes … with no vinegar smell.

I dilute regular fabric softener 2x so end up with 3x the amount and use that as a liquid or leave it all in a bucket and throw sponges in. wring out the sponge and throw 1 or 2 in the dryer as dryer sheets

I have an HE washer and dryer. I have been using this homemade fabric softener for about 6 months now and I could not be happier. It works great. Sometimes my laundry used to smell after washing and drying it but not anymore. I also starting leaving my washer machine door open a little. Again, this homemade fabric softener is great and I have definitely saved money. I use Suave or V05 and try to keep the scent something like a breeze or fruity scent.

I have a frontloader as well. I have been using frontload machines for 14 yrs now. The vinegar is great as an additive for the frontload machines as it cleans the machine as well. Run the mixture through the dispenser :). i also use 3 cups white vinegar & hot water through my machine regularly as a cleaner. use the tray dispenser to dispere 1 cup & dump the other 2 cups on the inside add a white towel & hot water cycle it all the way through . It keep it fresh & clean isnde no midlew or build up

Homemade Dryer Sheets

Directions
http://thefrugalgirls.com/2010/01/save-money-on-laundry-cut-dryer-sheets-in-half.html

comments:

I also make my own dryers sheets.
I take a third of a bottle of your favorite fabric softner and pour it into an empty gallon jug. (cleaned milk jug works great!) Fill the rest of the way with tap water and shake. Pour some into a small open plastic container. Take two new (plain cheap) sponges and cut them in half. Place cut sponges in softner mix and then pull one out, ringing it slightly and add to your dryer. These work great and you can just keep using the sponges again and again.

I made a mixture of 2 cups of cheep suave hair conditioner and 4 cups of water. Pour the conditioner in a pot on low heat add water and pour it into any container you can seal I used an old icecream bucket, I bought a pack of 6 sponges and cut them in half throw them in the bucket and when you need a dryer sheet wring out excess liquid from one sponge so it isn’t dripping wet when it goes in the dryer and you can re use these over and over and the liquid mixture will last a long time I have laundry for 7 people and it works great to save money.

I use an old washcloth: pour just a small amount of liquid fabric softener on it and toss it in the dryer. It works fantastic! It’s way more economical than adding the liquid to the washing machine.

Homemade Fabreze Recipe
http://thefrugalgirls.com/2013/03/diy-homemade-febreeze-recipe.html

Directions:
Add 3 tbsp. Fabric Softener {like your favorite scent of Downy} to empty spray bottle
Fill spray bottle with approx. 2 – 3 cups hot water. {depending on size of bottle}
Add in 1 tbsp. Baking Soda Mix, and enjoy!!
Portions can be adjusted slightly, depending on the size of your spray bottle.

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[ECP] Educational CyberPlayGround K12 Newsletters May 1

May is celebrated as the Music Month:

MUSIC EDUCATION, CLASSROOM RESOURCES AND MUSIC LAW

IDEAS FOR CLASSROOM USE

THE HISTORY OF JAZZ

Question: Can You Guess who this is?

A Grandson of slaves, a boy was born in a poor neighborhood of New Orleans known as the “Back of Town.” His father abandoned the family when the child was an infant, His mother became a prostitute and the boy and his sister had to live with their grandmother. Early in life he proved to be gifted for music and with three other kids he sang in the streets of New Orleans. His first gains were the coins that were thrown to them. A Jewish family, Karnofsky, who had immigrated from Lithuania to the USA had pity for the 7-year-old boy and brought him into their home. Initially given ‘work’ in the house, to feed this hungry child. There he remained and slept in this Jewish families home where, for the first time in his life he was treated with kindness and tenderness. When he went to bed, Mrs. Karnovsky sang him a Russian Lullaby that he would sing with her. Later, he learned to sing and play several Russian and Jewish songs. Over time, this boy became the adopted son of this family. The Karnofskys gave him money to buy his first musical instrument; as was the custom in the Jewish families.
They sincerely admired his musical talent. Later, when he became a professional musician and composer, he used these Jewish melodies in compositions, such as St. James Infirmary and Go Down Moses. The little black boy grew up and wrote a book about this Jewish family who had adopted him in 1907.
In memory of this family and until the end of his life, he wore a star of David and said that in this family he had learned “how to live real life and determination.”

Answer: You might recognize his name. This little boy was called Louis “Satchmo” Armstrong. Louis Armstrong proudly spoke fluent Yiddish!

New Orleans-based Musicologist John Baron discusses Louis Armstrong’s relationship with the Karnofskys, a New Orleans Jewish family he worked for, and who helped him buy his first musical instrument. Interview by Neil W. Levin.

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Italy new law passed get divorced in six months

History

Since the classic 1961 comedy “Divorce Italian Style” in which a Sicilian man played by Marcello Mastroianni desperately seeks a lover for his wife so he can catch them in the act, kill both in an “honor crime”, get a light prison sentence, and marry his younger cousin.  Divorce did not become legal here until nine years after the Oscar-winning film. As a concession to the Church, the 1970 law imposed a mandatory five-year separation period intended to make couples reconsider. In 1987, this was reduced to three years.

Italy has slashed the time it takes to get a divorce to six months from three years in the latest sign of the Catholic Church’s waning influence over life and politics here.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/04/23/us-italy-divorce-idUSKBN0NE1JD20150423

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The Slow Death of the University

The Slow Death of the University
By Terry Eagleton
Apr 6 2015
<http://chronicle.com/article/The-Slow-Death-of-the/228991/>

A few years ago, I was being shown around a large, very technologically advanced university in Asia by its proud president. As befitted so eminent a personage, he was flanked by two burly young minders in black suits and shades, who for all I knew were carrying Kalashnikovs under their jackets. Having waxed lyrical about his gleaming new business school and state-of-the-art institute for management studies, the president paused to permit me a few words of fulsome praise. I remarked instead that there seemed to be no critical studies of any kind on his campus. He looked at me bemusedly, as though I had asked him how many Ph.D.’s in pole dancing they awarded each year, and replied rather stiffly “Your comment will be noted.” He then took a small piece of cutting-edge technology out of his pocket, flicked it open and spoke a few curt words of Korean into it, probably “Kill him.” A limousine the length of a cricket pitch then arrived, into which the president was bundled by his minders and swept away. I watched his car disappear from view, wondering when his order for my execution was to be implemented.

This happened in South Korea, but it might have taken place almost anywhere on the planet. From Cape Town to Reykjavik, Sydney to São Paulo, an event as momentous in its own way as the Cuban revolution or the invasion of Iraq is steadily under way: the slow death of the university as a center of humane critique. Universities, which in Britain have an 800-year history, have traditionally been derided as ivory towers, and there was always some truth in the accusation. Yet the distance they established between themselves and society at large could prove enabling as well as disabling, allowing them to reflect on the values, goals, and interests of a social order too frenetically bound up in its own short-term practical pursuits to be capable of much self-criticism. Across the globe, that critical distance is now being diminished almost to nothing, as the institutions that produced Erasmus and John Milton, Einstein and Monty Python, capitulate to the hard-faced priorities of global capitalism.

Much of this will be familiar to an American readership. Stanford and MIT, after all, provided the very models of the entrepreneurial university. What has emerged in Britain, however, is what one might call Americanization without the affluence — the affluence, at least, of the American private educational sector.

This is even becoming true at those traditional finishing schools for the English gentry, Oxford and Cambridge, whose colleges have always been insulated to some extent against broader economic forces by centuries of lavish endowments. Some years ago, I resigned from a chair at the University of Oxford (an event almost as rare as an earthquake in Edinburgh) when I became aware that I was expected in some respects to behave less as a scholar than a CEO.

When I first came to Oxford 30 years earlier, any such professionalism would have been greeted with patrician disdain. Those of my colleagues who had actually bothered to finish their Ph.D.’s would sometimes use the title of “Mr.” rather than “Dr.,” since “Dr.” suggested a degree of ungentlemanly labor. Publishing books was regarded as a rather vulgar project. A brief article every 10 years or so on the syntax of Portuguese or the dietary habits of ancient Carthage was considered just about permissible. There had been a time earlier when college tutors might not even have bothered to arrange set tutorial times for their undergraduates. Instead, the undergraduate would simply drop round to their rooms when the spirit moved him for a glass of sherry and a civilized chat about Jane Austen or the function of the pancreas.

Today, Oxbridge retains much of its collegial ethos. It is the dons who decide how to invest the college’s money, what flowers to plant in their gardens, whose portraits to hang in the senior common room, and how best to explain to their students why they spend more on the wine cellar than on the college library. All important decisions are made by the fellows of the college in full session, and everything from financial and academic affairs to routine administration is conducted by elected committees of academics responsible to the body of fellows as a whole. In recent years, this admirable system of self-government has had to confront a number of centralizing challenges from the university, of the kind that led to my own exit from the place; but by and large it has stood firm. Precisely because Oxbridge colleges are for the most part premodern institutions, they have a smallness of scale about them that can serve as a model of decentralized democracy, and this despite the odious privileges they continue to enjoy.

[snip]

 

Good Riddance to the University

Cost Of College Degree In U.S. Has Increased 1,120 Percent In 30 Years, Report Says
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/08/15/cost-of-college-degree-increase-12-fold-1120-percent-bloomberg_n_1783700.html

The cost of a college degree in the United States has increased “12 fold” over the past 30 years, far outpacing the price inflation of consumer goods, medical expenses and food.

According to Bloomberg, college tuition and fees have increased 1,120 percent since records began in 1978.

Using this chart to explain its findings, Bloomberg reports that the rate of increase in college costs has been “four times faster than the increase in the consumer price index.” It also notes that “medical expenses have climbed 601 percent, while the price of food has increased 244 percent over the same period.”

<snip>

 

WHY has the tuition gone up?

Answer CEO SALARY

Answer THE AUTOMATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION

Answer MILITARY AND THE UNIVERSITY COMPLEX

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8 Atlanta educators in test-cheating scandal go to jail

TESTING

2015 Eight former Atlanta public school educators were ordered on Tuesday to serve between one and seven years in prison for their convictions on racketeering charges in one of the nation’s largest test-cheating scandals.
http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSKBN0N516D20150414

2011 Marred by Test Cheating Scandals Across US
From Atlanta to Philadelphia and Washington to Los Angeles, officials have accused hundreds of educators of changing answers on tests or giving answers to students. Just last week, Georgia investigators revealed that dozens of educators in Dougherty County either cheated or failed to prevent cheating on 2009 standardized tests.  In July, those same investigators accused nearly 180 educators in almost half of Atlanta’s 100 schools of cheating dating back to 2001 – which experts have called the largest cheating scandal in U.S. history.
http://www.districtadministration.com/news/2011-marred-test-cheating-scandals-across-us

2011 What Do We Do With Teachers and Administrators who CHEAT? The cheaters in Atlanta, D.C., Philadelphia, Houston, Baltimore and elsewhere took advantage of the neediest and most vulnerable children and changed their scores so it would appear they had mastered material, when they in fact had not.
http://www.edu-cyberpg.com/Teachers/standards-corruption.html

TEACHING TO THE TEST
If the test makers create tests that are too easy they lose money. Failure drivers their business.   Tags: #test #SAT #flunk, #drop out, #retention, #social promotion, #graduation rate, #exit exam, #left behind, #Light’s retention scale
The Opt Out movement
http://www.edu-cyberpg.com/Teachers/test.html

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